Mentions of https://voxpelli.com/2016/07/better-handle-npm-modules/

Drei aka Bitcoin Master
Folding phones, Plantry, Code is Law, npm modules, Unbound
I lol’d when Stuart said folding phones are a solutionin search of a problem.
Anonymous
När tågtrafiken kollapsar – vem fyller upp?
Chris Aldrich
Reply to Chris Finazzo about Jekyll and GoodReads alternatives
Replied to a tweet by Chris Finazzo (Twitter) I cannot use Goodreads. The user experience just makes me too sad.— julia ferraioli (@juliaferraioli) February 9, 2019 I stared using it about 8 months ago when I signed up for Audible. The site and app are hot garbage, so I’ve been looking at going the @indiewebcamp route... pic.twitter.com/BFUzDJ5XjP— Chris Finazzo (@chrisfinazzo) February 9, 2019 However, because I use Jekyll and don’t pray to some JavaScript-powered deity, I have to try to assemble things
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liked something
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liked something
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liked something
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liked something
Anonymous
Embracing the IndieWeb
Hugo transition complete, it is time to go Indie
Alan S.
Retuning up my indieweb
Over three years ago I spent a long weekend building my very own, basic but functional webmentions implementation. When I switched the site to Hugo from my homegrown pile of static-blog-building scripts last year, I put rebuilding webmention support way, way on the back burner, and never got back around to it. I really wasn’t fully geared up to make that system work with Hugo, so today with this writeup from Daniel Goldsmith I used the webmention endpoint from Pelle Wessman, to rebuild all of that function
Daniel Goldsmith (dgold)
Website transition to Hugo is complete! Now for the next stage:It is time to go Indie!https://ascraeus.org/embracing-the-indieweb/
Barry Frost
Introducing Webhook Mentions
Webhook Mentions: my very simple app to send Webmentions from your Microformats 2 markup GitHub Pages blog. https://barryfrost.com/2016/07/introducing-webhook-mentions
Michael Bishop
Jekyll & Microblogging
Jekyll, microblogging and IndieWeb
Malcolm Blaney
Indie-config and local storage
Pelle Wessman shared an interesting demo at IndieWebCamp Nuremberg over the weekend. If your site supports composing new posts based on web actions you can enter the relevant urls here: http://voxpelli.com/demo/indie-config and then whenever you visit a site that supports indie actions, it will redirect you to your own site to create a post. Magic! Wait, web actions? indie actions?? OK yes, what does all this mean? Let's explain it! web actions are simply an extra query parameter on your url that tells your
Anonymous
unrelenting.technology Posts Articles Replies Photos KB In reply to Pelle Wessman shared an interesting demo at IndieWebCamp Nuremberg over the weekend. If your site supports composing new posts based on web actions you can enter the relevant urls here: http://voxpelli.com/demo/indie-config and then whenever you visit a site that supports indie actions, it will redirect you to your own site to create a post. Magic! Wait, web actions? indie actions?? OK yes, what does all this mean? Let's explain it! web actions are simply an extra query parameter on your url that tells your composing UI what you want to do. For instance, I can follow the link https://unicyclic.com/mal/blog?like=example.com/some-post and my blog page will know that I want to create a post that likes example.com/some-post: If your post creation UI can do something like this, then it supports web actions.Indie actions are the other side of this, they are the links on posts that allow you to like or share it. You can see them on any post on unicyclic.com and many other sites support them. Now the trick is, the person who includes these actions on a post, can't specify the recipient of the action. That's where Indie config comes in. Indie config creates the link between the actions on a post and your own site. It does this by utilising the fact that web browsers can register protocol handlers for new schemes (ie http). Pelle came up with the web+action scheme, which you register in javascript with a url on your own site. Now this part is a bit technical, but the url on your site return some specially crafted html. In fact it's mostly javscript and it's job is to post a message about the web actions you support. Where does it post a message to? Well that might be the most clever part of the puzzle yet! Indie config dynamically injects an iframe into the page you're viewing, and sets it's src to web+action:load which pulls in your web action details. Now you have all the information you need to interact with the actions on the page. There is more detail to all this, but I wanted to mention how local storage can be used to improve this work flow. It's possible to do all this work as a stateless system, but local storage allows you to introduce some memory. Pelle has provided his demo site so that you can skip storing the special message posting javascript, instead he stores your details in local storage and uses them to post the message back to your iframe. I also use local storage in dobrado with indie config, but use it a little bit earlier in the series of steps. If I can successfully retrieve a site's web actions, I store them at that point in local storage. That means I don't need to keep looking for them once they're available, and I also provide a way to view and remove the current settings. It also means I can convert indie action links to real links since I already have all the details. So that's an overview of indie config and local storage! I'm glad to see they can be used together in other ways, and of course the two methods described are actually complimentary. — Malcolm Blaney on Apr 19, 2016 03:03 Huh, I thought the big reason for indie-config and its iframe hack (instead of just registering handlers for each action like web+reply, web+like) was that the config is not local to a browser! Yeah, another reason is flexibility – fallback links to Twitter actions, choosing the actions that are available… But is all that really necessary? I still think that simply registering web+reply, web+like, etc. handlers would’ve been better. posted Apr 20, 2016 11:00 in Replies using micropublish.herokuapp.com and updated Apr 20, 2016 11:00 powered by sweetroll2
Huh, I thought the big reason for indie-config and its iframe hack (instead of just registering handlers for each action like web+reply, web+like) was that the config is not local to a browser! Yeah, another reason is flexibility – fallback links to Twitter actions, choosing the actions that are available… But is all that really necessary? I still think that simply registering web+reply, web+like, etc. handlers would’ve been better.
Tantek Çelik
Testing webmentions in content @indiewebcamp:* https://jeena.net/photos/221* http://voxpelli.com/* https://aaronparecki.com/2016/04/16/22/foursquare* https://justonestep.de/notes/20160416-1417/* https://waterpigs.co.uk/notes/4goD_3/
Peter Molnar
Extending Press This in WordPress to support indieweb reply, like and repost
[object Object]
Anonymous
Kyle Mahan
@voxpelli @LanceCoyote you should be able to add the js to your Red Wind theme pretty easily, here they are in mine github.com/kylewm/redwind/blob/5079982251010fe504c9b1a8e7ef2b91c545210d/redwind/themes/boxy/templates/post.jinja2#L81
Aaron Gustafson
Enabling Webmentions in Jekyll
While I am really happy with my choice to move away from a dynamic website/blog to a static one—powered by Octopress, hosted for free on Github—it’s been pretty limiting when it comes to integrating comments and other more necessarily dynamic components. Like many folks in the Octopress/Jekyll community, I’ve opted to use Disqus’ free service to manage comments, but I’m not in love with it. First of all, it requires JavaScript. You know my stance on that. Now I’m willing to accept comments as an enhancem
Tyler
Now-a-days people can just use Yarn https://yarnpkg.com
Pelle Wessman
In reply to: https://tyler.cat/2016/now-a-days-people-can-just-use-yarn Yarn certainly helps with some parts of this. Eg. parts of "installed-check" can be replaced with "yarn check", but the engine checks, "dependency-check" and "husky" certainly still provide value when using Yarn. The ecosystem is to a large degree still the same, no matter if one uses the Yarn client or the npm client. 04 November 2016 by Pelle Wessman Like Share Reply See mentions of this post
Yarn certainly helps with some parts of this. Eg. parts of "installed-check" can be replaced with "yarn check", but the engine checks, "dependency-check" and "husky" certainly still provide value when using Yarn. The ecosystem is to a large degree still the same, no matter if one uses the Yarn client or the npm client.
Pelle Wessman
3 tricks to better handle npm modules
Developing with npm modules isn’t just installing modules and then updating them. In a team environment you might not even know when a new module should be installed or when its version requirement has changed. This can cause lots of weird unexpected behaviors when the installed modules doesn’t match the expectations of the app – and that annoys and is a waste of time. Here I’ll give you three tricks to avoid that. Tricks which I’ve begun to use over the years and which we’re currently using at my latest p
Pelle Wessman
3 tricks to better handle npm modules
Developing with npm modules isn’t just installing modules and then updating them. In a team environment you might not even know when a new module should be installed or when its version requirement has changed. This can cause lots of weird unexpected behaviors when the installed modules doesn’t match the expectations of the app – and that annoys and is a waste of time. Here I’ll give you three tricks to avoid that. Tricks which I’ve begun to use over the years and which we’re currently using at my latest p
Drei aka Bitcoin Master
Folding phones, Plantry, Code is Law, npm modules, Unbound
I lol’d when Stuart said folding phones are a solutionin search of a problem.
Anonymous
När tågtrafiken kollapsar – vem fyller upp?
Chris Aldrich
Reply to Chris Finazzo about Jekyll and GoodReads alternatives
Replied to a tweet by Chris Finazzo (Twitter) I cannot use Goodreads. The user experience just makes me too sad.— julia ferraioli (@juliaferraioli) February 9, 2019 I stared using it about 8 months ago when I signed up for Audible. The site and app are hot garbage, so I’ve been looking at going the @indiewebcamp route... pic.twitter.com/BFUzDJ5XjP— Chris Finazzo (@chrisfinazzo) February 9, 2019 However, because I use Jekyll and don’t pray to some JavaScript-powered deity, I have to try to assemble things
Someone
liked something
Someone
liked something
Someone
liked something
Someone
liked something
Anonymous
Embracing the IndieWeb
Hugo transition complete, it is time to go Indie
Alan S.
Retuning up my indieweb
Over three years ago I spent a long weekend building my very own, basic but functional webmentions implementation. When I switched the site to Hugo from my homegrown pile of static-blog-building scripts last year, I put rebuilding webmention support way, way on the back burner, and never got back around to it. I really wasn’t fully geared up to make that system work with Hugo, so today with this writeup from Daniel Goldsmith I used the webmention endpoint from Pelle Wessman, to rebuild all of that function
Daniel Goldsmith (dgold)
Website transition to Hugo is complete! Now for the next stage:It is time to go Indie!https://ascraeus.org/embracing-the-indieweb/
Barry Frost
Introducing Webhook Mentions
Webhook Mentions: my very simple app to send Webmentions from your Microformats 2 markup GitHub Pages blog. https://barryfrost.com/2016/07/introducing-webhook-mentions
Michael Bishop
Jekyll & Microblogging
Jekyll, microblogging and IndieWeb
Malcolm Blaney
Indie-config and local storage
Pelle Wessman shared an interesting demo at IndieWebCamp Nuremberg over the weekend. If your site supports composing new posts based on web actions you can enter the relevant urls here: http://voxpelli.com/demo/indie-config and then whenever you visit a site that supports indie actions, it will redirect you to your own site to create a post. Magic! Wait, web actions? indie actions?? OK yes, what does all this mean? Let's explain it! web actions are simply an extra query parameter on your url that tells your
Anonymous
unrelenting.technology Posts Articles Replies Photos KB In reply to Pelle Wessman shared an interesting demo at IndieWebCamp Nuremberg over the weekend. If your site supports composing new posts based on web actions you can enter the relevant urls here: http://voxpelli.com/demo/indie-config and then whenever you visit a site that supports indie actions, it will redirect you to your own site to create a post. Magic! Wait, web actions? indie actions?? OK yes, what does all this mean? Let's explain it! web actions are simply an extra query parameter on your url that tells your composing UI what you want to do. For instance, I can follow the link https://unicyclic.com/mal/blog?like=example.com/some-post and my blog page will know that I want to create a post that likes example.com/some-post: If your post creation UI can do something like this, then it supports web actions.Indie actions are the other side of this, they are the links on posts that allow you to like or share it. You can see them on any post on unicyclic.com and many other sites support them. Now the trick is, the person who includes these actions on a post, can't specify the recipient of the action. That's where Indie config comes in. Indie config creates the link between the actions on a post and your own site. It does this by utilising the fact that web browsers can register protocol handlers for new schemes (ie http). Pelle came up with the web+action scheme, which you register in javascript with a url on your own site. Now this part is a bit technical, but the url on your site return some specially crafted html. In fact it's mostly javscript and it's job is to post a message about the web actions you support. Where does it post a message to? Well that might be the most clever part of the puzzle yet! Indie config dynamically injects an iframe into the page you're viewing, and sets it's src to web+action:load which pulls in your web action details. Now you have all the information you need to interact with the actions on the page. There is more detail to all this, but I wanted to mention how local storage can be used to improve this work flow. It's possible to do all this work as a stateless system, but local storage allows you to introduce some memory. Pelle has provided his demo site so that you can skip storing the special message posting javascript, instead he stores your details in local storage and uses them to post the message back to your iframe. I also use local storage in dobrado with indie config, but use it a little bit earlier in the series of steps. If I can successfully retrieve a site's web actions, I store them at that point in local storage. That means I don't need to keep looking for them once they're available, and I also provide a way to view and remove the current settings. It also means I can convert indie action links to real links since I already have all the details. So that's an overview of indie config and local storage! I'm glad to see they can be used together in other ways, and of course the two methods described are actually complimentary. — Malcolm Blaney on Apr 19, 2016 03:03 Huh, I thought the big reason for indie-config and its iframe hack (instead of just registering handlers for each action like web+reply, web+like) was that the config is not local to a browser! Yeah, another reason is flexibility – fallback links to Twitter actions, choosing the actions that are available… But is all that really necessary? I still think that simply registering web+reply, web+like, etc. handlers would’ve been better. posted Apr 20, 2016 11:00 in Replies using micropublish.herokuapp.com and updated Apr 20, 2016 11:00 powered by sweetroll2
Huh, I thought the big reason for indie-config and its iframe hack (instead of just registering handlers for each action like web+reply, web+like) was that the config is not local to a browser! Yeah, another reason is flexibility – fallback links to Twitter actions, choosing the actions that are available… But is all that really necessary? I still think that simply registering web+reply, web+like, etc. handlers would’ve been better.
Tantek Çelik
Testing webmentions in content @indiewebcamp:* https://jeena.net/photos/221* http://voxpelli.com/* https://aaronparecki.com/2016/04/16/22/foursquare* https://justonestep.de/notes/20160416-1417/* https://waterpigs.co.uk/notes/4goD_3/
Peter Molnar
Extending Press This in WordPress to support indieweb reply, like and repost
[object Object]
Anonymous
Kyle Mahan
@voxpelli @LanceCoyote you should be able to add the js to your Red Wind theme pretty easily, here they are in mine github.com/kylewm/redwind/blob/5079982251010fe504c9b1a8e7ef2b91c545210d/redwind/themes/boxy/templates/post.jinja2#L81
Aaron Gustafson
Enabling Webmentions in Jekyll
While I am really happy with my choice to move away from a dynamic website/blog to a static one—powered by Octopress, hosted for free on Github—it’s been pretty limiting when it comes to integrating comments and other more necessarily dynamic components. Like many folks in the Octopress/Jekyll community, I’ve opted to use Disqus’ free service to manage comments, but I’m not in love with it. First of all, it requires JavaScript. You know my stance on that. Now I’m willing to accept comments as an enhancem
Tyler
Now-a-days people can just use Yarn https://yarnpkg.com
Pelle Wessman
In reply to: https://tyler.cat/2016/now-a-days-people-can-just-use-yarn Yarn certainly helps with some parts of this. Eg. parts of "installed-check" can be replaced with "yarn check", but the engine checks, "dependency-check" and "husky" certainly still provide value when using Yarn. The ecosystem is to a large degree still the same, no matter if one uses the Yarn client or the npm client. 04 November 2016 by Pelle Wessman Like Share Reply See mentions of this post
Yarn certainly helps with some parts of this. Eg. parts of "installed-check" can be replaced with "yarn check", but the engine checks, "dependency-check" and "husky" certainly still provide value when using Yarn. The ecosystem is to a large degree still the same, no matter if one uses the Yarn client or the npm client.
Pelle Wessman
3 tricks to better handle npm modules
Developing with npm modules isn’t just installing modules and then updating them. In a team environment you might not even know when a new module should be installed or when its version requirement has changed. This can cause lots of weird unexpected behaviors when the installed modules doesn’t match the expectations of the app – and that annoys and is a waste of time. Here I’ll give you three tricks to avoid that. Tricks which I’ve begun to use over the years and which we’re currently using at my latest p
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